Skip to content

Research

Take a look at our Department's research grant successes, and see all of the topics completed by our recent PhD and MA students:

  • Research Activities
    Academic Staff
    Name Research Activities

    Prof Rachel Ankeny

    Rachel currently holds an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant (2014-16) entitled “Making Plants Better, Making Australia Better? A History of Genetic Modification Science, Policy, and Community Attitudes in Australia” (A$291,669).

    In food studies, Rachel's research interests include food ethics, food habits of women and children, food habits in the Italian diaspora, and the relationship of science to food habits. She received an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant (2011-13) entitled “What Shall We Have for Tea? Toward a New Discourse of Food Ethics in Contemporary Australia” (A$155,000), and an Australian Research Council Linkage Project grant (2013-16) with A/Prof Wendy Umberger entitled “Getting to the Meat of the Matter: Social and Economic Issues in Animal Welfare in Australia's Livestock Industry” (A$287,607). For more details on the projects relating to food ethics, and to volunteer for research, please see the food values page.

    Rachel is also the lead investigator on an Australian Research Council Linkage Project grant entitled "Hostel Stories: Toward a Richer Narrative of the Lived Experiences of Migrants" (2012-14) in collaboration with the Migration Museum and in partnership with the cities of Charles Sturt and Port Adelaide Enfield, State Records, and the Vietnamese Community in Australia (SA).

    Dr Merridee Bailey Merridee Bailey is a Research Fellow in the Change Program of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, investigating emotional discourses surrounding merchant practices in London over the late medieval and early modern period, c. 1450-1650.
    Dr Katie Barclay
    Dr Heather Bray
    Dr Thomas Buchanan Tom is a scholar of nineteenth-century America with a focus on the history of enslaved people. He is interested in labour, race, and popular protest in the era of the Civil War. Current projects include: a book on scholarly interpretations of enslaved peoples, a project which considers the role of emotions in the social protests of enslaved and contract workers, and a new project "A Cultural History of BHP Billiton" which extends his interests to Australia, and is co-authored with Ph.D. student Thomas Mackay. This project aims to bring the emerging literature on the history of capitalism to Australian shores.
    Ms Jenni Caruso Jenni's research interests inform all of her teaching using the methodology of "Ego-histoire" introduced by the French historian Pierre Nora (Gallimard, 1987) though which she projects her life story work to convey history. Jenni's PhD research focuses on the effects and impacts of anthropology on removal policy and the inter-relationships between church, state and academia in the direction of those policies and their contemporary impacts on the Stolen Generations.
    A/Prof Vesna Drapac Vesna’s research interests are primarily in the area of modern European history, with particular focus on the social and cultural impact of war in the twentieth century; the historiography of resistance and collaboration in Hitler’s Europe; representations of women at war; film and history; and Catholic devotional life and practice. Several of these interests converge in her recent book, Constructing Yugoslavia: A Transnational History, which was published in 2010.  The book broadly covers the period from the late 1850s to the death of Tito in 1980 and provides a novel perspective on the idea of Yugoslavia through its various permutations.   She is currently working on a number of projects: the early films of Robert Bresson; the Yugoslav Partisans in history and memory; the historiography of the Second World War in Europe in a comparative context; and the international appeal of Therese of Lisieux in the mid-twentieth  century.

    Vesna’s secondary research interest is the history of twentieth-century Australian immigration in the context of identity politics, multiculturalism and citizenship. 
    A/Prof Rob Foster Robert and Amanda Nettelbeck, with partner investigators Professor Russell Smandych of the University of Manitoba and Emeritus Professor Lou Knafla of the University of Calgary, are currently involved in a project which is exploring the establishment of European authority on the frontiers of Australia and western Canada. A monograph, tentatively entitled Fragile Settlements, will be published by the University of British Columbia Press in 2014.
    Prof David Lemmings David is lead Investigator of the ARC Centre for Excellence in the History of Emotions.
    Dr Gareth Pritchard Modern European history focussing on social history of politics in the post-World War Two period
    Professor Amanda Nettelbeck
    A/Prof Paul Sendziuk Paul is currently undertaking two research projects. The first is titled 'The Art of AIDS Prevention: Cultural Responses to HIV/AIDS in Australia, South Africa and the United States', which explores the nexus between art and health promotion and the way in which artists can save lives. The second, titled 'A Forgotten Odyssey: A Study of Polish-Australian Displacement, Identity and Memory through Life Stories and Material Culture', investigates the poorly understood experience of Polish displaced persons who migrated to Australia after World War Two. Two of the outcomes of this project will be a collection of oral histories to be held by the National Library of Australia and exhibition at the Migration Museum.
    Dr Claire Walker Claire is a scholar of early modern religion, gender and politics. She has written extensively about exiled English convents in France, the Southern Netherlands and Portugal in the 16th and 17th centuries. As part of an ARC funded project on moral panics, she considered the ways that fears about the threat Catholics posed church, state and society were represented in the media. Claire is currenting working on an ARC Centre for the History of Emotions project, 'Governing Emotion: The Affective family, the Press and the Law in Early Modern Britain', with Professor David Lemmings and Dr Katie Barclay; and she continues to research anti-Catholic fear in early modern England.
    Dr Abaigeal Warfield
  • Research Grant Successes

    Rachel Ankeny: Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant (2014-16) entitled “Making Plants Better, Making Australia Better? A History of Genetic Modification Science, Policy, and Community Attitudes in Australia” (A$291,669)

    Rachel Ankeny: Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant (2011-13) entitled “What Shall We Have for Tea? Toward a New Discourse of Food Ethics in Contemporary Australia” (A$155,000),

    Rachel Ankeny: Australian Research Council Linkage Project grant (2013-16) with A/Prof Wendy Umberger entitled “Getting to the Meat of the Matter: Social and Economic Issues in Animal Welfare in Australia's Livestock Industry” (A$287,607)

  • ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions
    The University of Adelaide is a major partner in the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions. As announced by the Federal Government, the Centre will receive $24.25 million over seven years (2011-17), and Adelaide will be allocated substantial funding for research. As one the of the Program Leaders of the new Centre, Professor David Lemmings, heads a team of researchers who will study mass emotions and their influence on historical change.
Department of History
Address

Level 7, Napier Building
THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
SA 5005 AUSTRALIA

Contact

T: +61 8 8313 4249
humanities@adelaide.edu.au