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Honours

Study Honours in either International Development or Anthropology.

Both are taught over two courses in Semester 1 along with the research dissertation which continues through Semester 2.

  • International Development

    Honours in International Development enables students to significantly deepen their knowledge of the issues and problems affecting the states, societies and cultures of the developing world, and their understanding of the agencies, policies and programs that exist to address these problems.

    Drawing on a wide range of theoretical and empirical material from across the world, the program examines key development issues including: poverty, governance, debt reduction, inequality, human rights, HIV/AIDS, conflict, ecology, the environment, health and gender rights. Honours is a crucial first step towards a career in professional practice and/or postgraduate research.

    There are three components to the Honours program:

    • Development Theory (DEVT 4002)
    • Contested Concepts (DEVT 4001)
    • Research Dissertation (DEVT 4003)

    Students are assessed on the basis of one essay for each of the taught courses. Each of these essays, which are handed in towards the end of each course, are a maximum of 6,000 words long, and are each worth 25% of the final Honours grade.

    The research dissertation is handed in at the end of the academic year. It is a maximum of 15,000 words long, and is worth 50% of the final Honours grade.

    International Development Honours Handbook

  • Anthropology

    Honours in Anthropology enables students to undertake a period of intensive study utilising contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of culture and society such as post-structuralism, post-colonialism and post-modernism.

    Recent reflection has forced recognition that the universalism and scientific objectivism that previously underpinned Anthropology in the modern era also upheld positions relating to ethnocentrism, colonialism and power and to the privileging of enlightenment western philosophical traditions that contend the world can be ‘known’ and contains empirical truths. Contemporary social theory, in raising such questions, confronts the foundations of both anthropological knowledge and practice. As the conditions of being human change, and as global and local processes and conditions expand and intertwine, so too must Anthropology’s range of theoretical, methodological and analytic techniques for exploring such conditions. The world in which we live is inherently complex, it is politically and economically interdependent, it is culturally interpenetrated and it is changing at an ever-increasing pace.

    There are three main seminar components in the Honours Program:

    • Ethnographic Fieldwork (ANTH 4002)
    • Anthropological Theory (ANTH 4001)
    • Research Dissertation (ANTH 4003)

    Students are assessed on the basis of one essay for each of the taught courses. Each of these essays, which are handed in towards the end of each course, are a maximum of 6,000 words long, and are each worth 25% of the final Honours grade.

    The research dissertation is handed in at the end of the academic year. It is a maximum of 15,000 words long, and is worth 50% of the final Honours grade.

    Anthropology Honours Handbook

Apply for Honours

Department of Anthropology
& Development Studies
Address

Ground Floor, Napier Building
THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
SA 5005 AUSTRALIA

Contact

T: +61 8 8313 5730
socialsciences@adelaide.edu.au